PDF For the Love of Life: Transition from Darkness to Light

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online For the Love of Life: Transition from Darkness to Light file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with For the Love of Life: Transition from Darkness to Light book. Happy reading For the Love of Life: Transition from Darkness to Light Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF For the Love of Life: Transition from Darkness to Light at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF For the Love of Life: Transition from Darkness to Light Pocket Guide.

Yes, when you are grieving, it is necessary to feel sadness and other so-called dark emotions. But why is it necessary? Why does emotional pain have to exist at all? The answer is that sadness plays an essential role. It forces us to regroup—physically, cognitively, emotionally, socially, and spiritually.

When we are sad, we instinctively turn inward.

Browse By Tag

We withdraw. We slow down. Time out. In fact, many of the acute symptoms of grief force us to slow down. We also tend to feel tired and sluggish. We are listless emotionally as well as physically.

It is the willingness to connect with what is dark, deep, and not necessarily pleasant. It is during spirit work that you find renewed meaning and joy in life. Soul work comes before spirit work. The spirit cannot ascend until the soul first descends. The withdrawal, slowing down, and stillness of the dark emotions create the conditions necessary for soul work. Grief lives in liminal space. When you are in liminal space—or limbo—you are not busily and unthinkingly going about your daily life. Neither are you living from a place of assuredness about your relationships and beliefs.

Instead, you are unsettled. But it is only in liminal space that you can reconstruct your shattered worldview and reemerge as the transformed you that is ready to live and love fully again. Most of us know we harbor darkness inside of us. We secretly feel not only pain and fear but also hate, cruelty, lust, and other emotions we judge as shameful. We have thought and done things that we hope no one else ever learns of. Often parts of our grief, too, inhabit this world of shameful, hidden thoughts and feelings. In Greek mythology, Persephone becomes the queen of the underworld.

Faulhaber Funeral Home

It is not a throne she sought after, however. Living happily on earth with her family, she is kidnapped by the god of the underworld, Hades, and, after some trickery and back-and-forth, is forced to remain there with him six months of every year. All of us are Persephones, really. The trick is in awakening ourselves to the reality that our underworlds are not shameful. Rather, they are simply pieces of the complex puzzle called being human. I think that sometimes insomnia, like our dark emotions, has something to teach us.

We also tend to feel tired and sluggish. We are listless emotionally as well as physically. It is the willingness to connect with what is dark, deep, and not necessarily pleasant. It is during spirit work that you find renewed meaning and joy in life. Soul work comes before spirit work. The spirit cannot ascend until the soul first descends.

Guerra & Gutierrez Mortuary : Los Angeles, California (CA)

The withdrawal, slowing down, and stillness of the dark emotions create the conditions necessary for soul work. Grief lives in liminal space. When you are in liminal space—or limbo—you are not busily and unthinkingly going about your daily life. Neither are you living from a place of assuredness about your relationships and beliefs. Instead, you are unsettled. But it is only in liminal space that you can reconstruct your shattered worldview and reemerge as the transformed you that is ready to live and love fully again. Most of us know we harbor darkness inside of us.

We are transitioning from darkness to light!! The nations can't repent on their own terms!

We secretly feel not only pain and fear but also hate, cruelty, lust, and other emotions we judge as shameful. We have thought and done things that we hope no one else ever learns of. Often parts of our grief, too, inhabit this world of shameful, hidden thoughts and feelings. In Greek mythology, Persephone becomes the queen of the underworld. It is not a throne she sought after, however. Living happily on earth with her family, she is kidnapped by the god of the underworld, Hades, and, after some trickery and back-and-forth, is forced to remain there with him six months of every year.

All of us are Persephones, really. The trick is in awakening ourselves to the reality that our underworlds are not shameful. Rather, they are simply pieces of the complex puzzle called being human. I think that sometimes insomnia, like our dark emotions, has something to teach us. Wakefulness during the dark hours offers us quieter, more mysterious opportunities for reflection than those we may encounter during the day. Of course, I understand that the dark hours can also conjure our darkest fears. When we awake in the middle of the night, we may lie in bed ruminating over what we have lost as well as our fears for the future.

Even if someone else is sleeping nearby, we may feel deeply alone. If you experience such nighttime despair, try to remember that this is an opportunity to embrace your pain.

Are you an Empath?

It is a normal and necessary part of your journey. Consider giving it movement by getting up and out of bed for a while. Keep the lights off or low and pace as you think. Step outside into the moonlight and breathe the night air. Or try writing down your nighttime thoughts and feelings in a journal. When people are sympathetic to you, they are noticing and feeling concern for your circumstances, usually at a distance.

A useless light, one that does not know that light is only useful when it is placed in the darkness! It's not darkness that is the enemy. We have vilified people's scars, people's wounds, and people's hiding places and we have told them that they don't belong "out here like that. Like your buddy Nietzsche said, 'He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And if you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss also gazes into you. They are neither one nor the other; rather, they encompass all aspects, death and love and every nuance of life in between. And through this simple fact of their humanity, they live on.

I became fully aware that there is no intrinsic difference between me and the killer, rapist, or thief—we are all human. There is more to them then the crime they have committed.